Posted by: archaccess | March 2, 2015

Year 12 Archaeology Study Day at St John’s College

On 23rd March 2015, St John’s College in Cambridge is offering Year 12 students the opportunity to learn about the study of Archaeology at the University of Cambridge through a diverse and stimulating range of sample lectures and seminars with current students and academics.
 St johns

The University of Cambridge was the first university in the UK to teach Archaeology and is indeed celebrating 100 years of offering a degree in the subject in 2015. The current undergraduate course approaches different period, area and methodological focuses in the subject through theory and practice in both the humanities and the sciences. The Archaeology Division’s website includes testimonials from students about the fieldwork opportunities available here and the graduate career prospects here. The study of Archaeology at Cambridge also includes Egyptology and Assyriology, and is part of the Human, Social and Political Science Tripos which offers both breadth and specialisation across a range of disciplines.

Students attending the Study Day at St John’s College on 23rd March 2015 will receive sample lectures from academics on subjects including archaeological science, forensic archaeology, ancient languages and the world of the pharaohs, and will take part in small-group discussions and workshops with current students. The day will also involve lunch and a tour of St John’s, with advice from the College’s admissions team on how to make a competitive application to Cambridge. The draft programme is available here.

Registration for the event is now open on the St John’s College website here, and will close on Monday 9th March 2015. The Study Day is open to individuals and small groups (no more than 4 students per school/college) in the UK. Priority will be given to students attending state-maintained schools if the event is oversubscribed. For more information, please contact the St John’s College Access Officer, Megan Roberts, at accessofficer@joh.cam.ac.uk.

FEAG talk: Tuesday 10 March, 7.30 pm, at the Tony Cooper Suite,
Cottenham Village College
‘Portals to the Past: Recent finds on the Crossrail archaeology
programme’ by Jay Carver

Jay Carver, Project Archaeologist for Crossrail, will be giving a talk
on ‘Portals to the Past: Recent finds on the Crossrail archaeology
programme’. Jay will explain how the construction of Crossrail through
the heart of London is resulting in one of the most extensive
archaeological programmes ever undertaken in the UK. The project spans
118 kilometres with more than 30 construction sites and has had more
than 100 archaeologists involved in the work so far. Finds range from
long extinct Ice Age animals to medieval plague burial grounds and more
recent Industrial Archaeology of London’s Victorian era.
All welcome.
See also  www.feag.co.uk

Posted by: archaccess | January 26, 2015

ITV Anglia Report on Covehithe Fieldwalking

Below follows a short report from ITV Anglia on the fieldwalking project undertaken last week in Covehithe, Suffolk by the HLF-funded Touching the Tide project and Access Cambridge Archaeology. The sound is a bit muffled, but enjoy!

This news report originally aired on Thursday 22nd January, 2015 on ITV Anglia.

Posted by: archaccess | January 26, 2015

2014 annual report from the ACA blog

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 8,400 times in 2014. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 3 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Posted by: archaccess | January 23, 2015

Covehithe Fieldwalking with Touching the Tide

The Heritage Lottery funded Touching the Tide landscape partnership project along with Access Cambridge Archaeology (ACA) organised a two-day fieldwalking project on 21st-22nd January.

Over 35 participants braved the chilly, windy conditions in Covehithe, Suffolk. Covehithe is located on the North Sea coast approximately 4 miles (6.4km) north of Southwold and suffers from the highest rate of erosion in the UK with nearly 5m disappearing into the sea every year. As such, the recovery and recording of its remaining archaeology is all the more necessary.

Covehithe Church

Covehithe Church

Dr Carenza Lewis gives a presentation on the benefits and methods of fieldwalking

Dr Carenza Lewis gives a presentation on the benefits and methods of fieldwalking

Dr Carenza Lewis of ACA gave a presentation on the benefits and methods of fieldwalking before the fieldwalkers headed out into the barely-above-freezing conditions.  A field immediately to the west of Covehithe Church was gridded out at 20m intervals and teams of two were sent out to systematically collect finds from their allocated grids.

Fieldwalking

Fieldwalking

Cat Ranson, ACA archaeological supervisor, records the finds bags as they come in

Cat Ranson, ACA archaeological supervisor, records the finds bags as they come in (with frozen fingers!)

This field yielded a wide range of finds from Neolithic flint flakes, Roman pottery, one sherd of Anglo-Saxon pottery, all the way through medieval and post-medieval sherds. Even at this early stage the finds from this field have given us a better idea where the medieval settlement was located in and around the church prior to the Black Death. Once the finds are cleaned up and identified by experts, a report will be made available on this blog and the ACA website here.

A few of the finds

A few of the finds

Sorting through the finds

Sorting through the finds

The majority of participants were from the local area and chose to join in because they were interested in both archaeology and the local history of the site. The event was rated good or excellent by 100% of participants with 94% rating it as excellent. Participants commented that the fieldwalking was “interesting, educational, fun and healthy.” Many were keen to carry on fieldwalking in the future and even set up their own groups!

After a long day fieldwalking tea and cake are always welcome!

After a long day fieldwalking tea and cake are always welcome!

Thank you to all the volunteers who braved the cold and wintry elements and special thanks to Bill Jenman and Kate Osborne of Touching the Tide for organising the fieldwalking and providing copious amounts of cake, Wood Farm Barn for hosting us and pottery expert John Newman for his on-site expertise.

 

 

Posted by: archaccess | January 19, 2015

ACA’s 9th annual Thank-You Day event

On Saturday 17th January, Access Cambridge Archaeology held their 9th annual Thank-You Day event to thank all HEFA coordinators past and present in the McDonald Institute for Archaeology Research here in Cambridge. A lot of work goes into organising each HEFA event with arrangements made by local coordinators who oversee the set up of the dig, as well as many logistics, including recruiting sites for test pitting and are also the main point of contact for us and volunteers. Their hard work, enthusiasm and dedication is essential for the continuation of ACA’s work, not only in the reasearch of Currently Occupied Rural Settlements (CORS), but with also the young people who attend each HEFA, giving them a unique experience and insight into both archaeology as well as higher education and enables them to develop personal, social, analytical and learning skills for their futures.

Thank you day 2015

ACA’s director, Dr Carenza Lewis began the day by showing photographs and the main results from the 13 HEFA’s  in 2014 which involved 52 schools throughout East Anglia and Hampshire that were attended by 526 students with 98 members of school staff, who dug a total of 211 test pits. This takes the total number of 1m² test pits excavated by the end of 2014 to an impressive 1,891 from ACA’s beginning in 2005!

The 13 villages that were excavated in in 2014 were mainly return visits to sites where we had previously excavated, including Writtle (Essex), Acle (Norfolk), Walberswick (Suffolk), Garboldisham (Norfolk), Daws Heath (Essex), Long Melford (Suffolk), Great Amwell (Hertfordshire), North Warnborough (Hampshire), Hindringham (Norfolk) and Manuden (Essesx). The new villages involved for the first time in 2014 were Rampton (Cambridgeshire), Sawtry (Cambridgeshire) and Riseley (Bedfordshire).

P1000012     P1000016

After a buffet lunch in the McDonald, where there was also a chance to socialise with the ACA team as well as with other coordinators, before the start of the afternoon talk, which focused on the community work that ACA has been involved with over the past 12 months throughout the country.

With Touching the Tide, a Heritage Lottery Funded (HLF) three year landscape partnership scheme along the Suffolk coastline, ACA undertook both fieldwalking and geophysics at Snape in Suffolk, as well as test pitting through both Southwold and Reydon on the north Suffolk coast. Additional test pitting was undertaken in both Sudbury and Nayland, both in Suffolk as well as further excavations by Stour Valley Community Archaeology group (SVCA) at Goldingham Hall.

The presentations also looked back at the celebration of 10 years of ACA that was held in October 2014 at the University of Cambridge, where Dr Lewis looked back over the last decade and the work that has been undertaken by ACA with its related research and outreach. This was then followed by a drinks reception hosted by the Festival of Ideas at the University of Cambridge that was attended by close friends and collegues of ACA. The day ended with a look at what the future will hold for ACA, including plans to take the HEFA programme nationally across England over the next four years.

 

Creative Commons Licence

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museum pic

The Museum of Cambridge and the Cambridge Museum of Technology are both undertaking oral history projects.

These two independent museums are working together to document the history of engineering in the city, as well as recording the understanding of the city’s history as it is understood by local adults with neurological conditions.

The two projects are being developed according to a high industrial standard, and offers a chance for volunteers see how these projects are run from start to finish, along with providing training for oral history work.  Volunteers are needed to help record, transcribe, and catalogue interviews within an archive, develop reminiscence boxes, and handle the administration that goes in to oral histories.

We would be happy to accept volunteers from three hours to three years – if you have time you would like to donate, we can find a place for you!  If you are passionate about history and want to help preserve Cambridge’s past, then please contact Sheldon at sheldon@museumofcambridge.org.uk

The museums can be found online.  See www.museumoftechnology.com and www.museumofcambridge.org.uk to see how they engage with their communities and with history.

Posted by: archaccess | January 12, 2015

Places still available for fieldwaking in Covehithe, Suffolk

There are still a small number of places available if you would like to learn about and take part on a fieldwalking event in Covehithe, north of Southwold in Suffolk. This will be run by the Heritage Lottery funded Touching the Tide landscape partnership project along with Access Cambridge Archaeology (ACA)

Volunteers are still needed for the Wednesday 21st January, the first of two days of fieldwalking in Covehithe (the 22nd is now fully booked).

If you would like to take part, it is not too late and places will be allocated on a first come first served basis. Please email touchingthetide@suffolk.gov.uk with your name, email address and phone number and then also send a cheque for £10 (payable to Suffolk County Council) and post it to:

Bill Jenman
Touching the Tide Project Manager
Suffolk Coast & Heaths AONB
Dock Lane, Melton, Woodbridge, Suffolk, IP12 1PE

For more information about the dig please click here. Volunteers of all ages are welcome to help out, as long as they can spare the time and it doesn’t matter if you haven’t fieldwalked before, so long as you have both the enthusiasm and tthe interest to be outside looking for finds in the middle of winter!

(Touching the Tide also state that unfortunately no place can be confirmed until a cheque is received).
Posted by: archaccess | December 19, 2014

Merry Christmas from ACA

ACA XMAS CARD 2014We would just like to wish everyone a very merry christmas from us all here at ACA! And we’ll be looking forward to starting a new field season of Archaeology in the spring, so hopefully we’ll be seeing many of you then for a great 2015.

The ACA office will be closed from the end of today and will re-open Monday 5th January

Posted by: archaccess | December 15, 2014

Covehithe Fieldwalking with Touching the Tide

As part of the Heritage Lottery funded Touching the Tide landscape partnership project, Access Cambridge Archaeology (ACA) are currently looking for volunteers to take part in fieldwalking at Covehithe, north of Southwold, in Suffolk, on Thursday 22nd January (weather permitting), to follow on from the already fully booked day on Wednesday 21st January.

Ten more places are still available on the Thursday but they will be allocated on a first come first served basis.
If you wish to take part, please email touchingthetide@suffolk.gov.uk with your name, email address and phone number and then also send a cheque for £10 (payable to Suffolk County Council) and post it to:

Bill Jenman
Touching the Tide Project Manager
Suffolk Coast & Heaths AONB
Dock Lane, Melton, Woodbridge, Suffolk, IP12 1PE

For more information about the dig please click here. Volunteers of all ages are welcome to help out, as long as they can spare the time and it doesn’t matter if you haven’t fieldwalked before, so long as you have both the enthusiasm and tthe interest to be outside looking for finds in the middle of winter!

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